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Offline agate

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(Abst.) Evaluating the safety of β-interferons in MS...
« on: May 14, 2017, 02:52:21 pm »
From PubMed, May 14, 2017:

Quote
Neurology. 2017 May 12.

Evaluating the safety of β-interferons in MS: A series of nested case-control studies.

de Jong HJI1, Kingwell E1, Shirani A1, Cohen Tervaert JW1, Hupperts R1, Zhao Y1, Zhu F1, Evans C1, van der Kop ML1, Traboulsee A1, Gustafson P1, Petkau J1, Marrie RA1, Tremlett H2; British Columbia Multiple Sclerosis Clinic Neurologists.
Collaborators (14)

Traboulsee A, Sayao AL, Devonshire V, Hashimoto S, Hooge J, Kastrukoff L, Oger J, Adams D, Craig D, Meckling S, Daly L, Hrebicek O, Parton D, Atwell-Pope K.

Author information

1
From the Division of Neurology and Centre for Brain Health (H.J.I.d.J., E.K., A.S., Y.Z., F.Z., M.L.v.d.K., A.T., H.T.), Department of Medicine, and Vancouver Coastal Health Research Institute, University of British Columbia, Canada; School for Mental Health and Neuroscience (H.J.I.d.J., J.W.C.T., R.H.), Maastricht University Medical Center, the Netherlands; College of Pharmacy and Nutrition (C.E.), University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Canada; Department Public Health Sciences (M.L.v.d.K.), Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Statistics (P.G., J.P.), University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada; and Departments of Internal Medicine and Community Health Sciences (R.A.M.), Max Rady College of Medicine, Rady Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada.
2
From the Division of Neurology and Centre for Brain Health (H.J.I.d.J., E.K., A.S., Y.Z., F.Z., M.L.v.d.K., A.T., H.T.), Department of Medicine, and Vancouver Coastal Health Research Institute, University of British Columbia, Canada; School for Mental Health and Neuroscience (H.J.I.d.J., J.W.C.T., R.H.), Maastricht University Medical Center, the Netherlands; College of Pharmacy and Nutrition (C.E.), University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Canada; Department Public Health Sciences (M.L.v.d.K.), Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Statistics (P.G., J.P.), University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada; and Departments of Internal Medicine and Community Health Sciences (R.A.M.), Max Rady College of Medicine, Rady Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada.

OBJECTIVE:

To examine the association between interferon-β (IFN-β) and potential adverse events using population-based health administrative data in British Columbia, Canada.

METHODS:

Patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) who were registered at a British Columbia Multiple Sclerosis Clinic (1995-2004) were eligible for inclusion and were followed up until death, absence from British Columbia, exposure to a non-IFN-β disease-modifying drug, or December 31, 2008. Incidence rates were estimated for each potential adverse event (selected a priori and defined with ICD-9/10 diagnosis codes from physician and hospital claims).

A nested case-control study was conducted to assess the odds of previous IFN-β exposure for each potential adverse event with at least 30 cases. Cases were matched by age (5 years), sex, and year of cohort entry, with up to 20 randomly selected (by incidence density sampling) controls. Odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were estimated with conditional logistic regression adjusted for age at cohort entry.

RESULTS:

Of the 2,485 eligible patients, 77.9% were women, and 1,031 were treated with IFN-β during follow-up. From the incidence analyses, 27 of the 47 potential adverse events had at least 30 cases. Patients with incident stroke (ORadj 1.83, 95% CI 1.16-2.89), migraine (ORadj 1.55, 95% CI 1.18-2.04), depression (ORadj 1.33, 95% CI 1.13-1.56), and hematologic abnormalities (ORadj 1.32, 95% CI 1.01-1.72) were more likely to have previous exposure to IFN-β than controls.

CONCLUSIONS:

Among patients with RRMS, IFN-β was associated with a 1.8- and 1.6-fold increase in the risk of stroke and migraine and 1.3-fold increases in depression and hematologic abnormalities.




https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28500224
MS Speaks--online for 13 years

SPMS, diagnosed 1980. Avonex 2001-2004. Copaxone 2007-2010.

 

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